Released AUGUST 2016 - The launch of the new book, FINDING PAX.

“Finding Pax reads like a reflective and literate diary crossed with a mystery.”
—LAWRENCE W. CHEEK, author, The Year of the Boat
“Introduces us to the thriving subculture of craftsmanship and expertise among her neighbors in Port Townsend, Washington...the waterfront culture of Sausalito, the self-reliance of British Columbia’s islanders, and finally the sailing communities of Denmark. Her book is nothing less than a love story for a wooden boat. —TOM JACKSON, Senior Editor, WoodenBoat
“ A love affair, a quest, and adventure—that is what happened when a woman broke her promise and bought a wooden boat. Kaci vividly describes how this broken promise filled her life with new friendships and gave her a good story to share.”
—LIN PARDEY, sailor, author of Storm Tactics Handbook
“A fascinating glimpse into the mysterious forces that continue to draw us back to boats and the sea.”
—ROSS ANDERSON, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, Seattle Times

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UPCOMING EVENTS

ABOUT THE BOOK, THE AUTHOR, THE BOAT

Kaci's seven-year search to find Pax's history, back to 1936, in three countries - Canada, America and Denmark. An unexpected journey.

Kaci's seven-year search to find Pax's history, back to 1936, in three countries - Canada, America and Denmark. An unexpected journey.

synopsis

On an island in Denmark where the oldest oak tree in Europe grows, a lone builder nicknamed “the perfectionist” crafted a boat with his hands. In 1936, the boat was finished and her journey began.

Seventy years later in Port Townsend, Washington—just minutes after a near catastrophe was averted in the marina outside her office window—Kaci Cronkhite opened an email. A Danish spidsgatter named Pax was for sale in Victoria, British Columbia.

The journey that brought the two together became a quest that connected families in three countries with history that had been lost. 

What Kaci didn’t know—what no one knew—was where and how far Pax had journeyed, what she survived those seven decades and what those who loved her would always remember.

Kaci and Pax sailing on Port Townsend Bay in 2009. Photo by ©Michael Berman.

Kaci and Pax sailing on Port Townsend Bay in 2009. Photo by ©Michael Berman.

the author

From 1994 to 2001, Kaci Cronkhite sailed more than 60,000 miles as hired crew on boats in oceans around the world, earned a Captain's license, conducted research, wrote articles, and taught all aspects of ocean passage-making.

In 2001, after completing a world circumnavigation, she attended the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival. On September 11, the day she was heading back out to sea, planes crashed into the World Trade Center. Like others around the world, the incident altered the course of her life.

She stayed in Port Townsend and a few months later, was asked to take the helm of the Festival. For a decade, she served as director of the event in addition to executive roles with Wooden Boat Foundation & Northwest Maritime Center. 

In 2007, Pax entered her life unexpectedly. There, this story begins.

Eric "Moose" Wilson caulking Pax in 2011. One of thirty Port Townsend marine trades people who worked on Pax.

Eric "Moose" Wilson caulking Pax in 2011. One of thirty Port Townsend marine trades people who worked on Pax.

the boat-Pax

"She" was built in 1936. If you don’t already know, boats are traditionally feminine. In her case, it didn’t take an expert to understand why. She was voluptuous. Wide and full in volume, buxom for and aft, she was all about the curves.

Technically, Pax is a “spidsgatter,” a design term chosen in Denmark to brand a new sailboat racing class in 1926. In English, the word translates from Danish as “two pointy ends” or “two butts.” In America, we say “double-ender.” 

Spidsgatters were built to specifications in six sizes, commissioned by individual owners. Pax represents the second-largest size, at twenty-eight feet long and nearly ten feet wide. Fewer than two hundred were built. Of the estimated twenty to thirty spidsgatters sold to North America in the 1960s, only a dozen remain. 

But her history was lost.

Order your copy of the book Finding PAX

 
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The story of...

The story of a little wooden boat built in Denmark, 1936, and Kaci Cronkhite's seven-year quest to find her lost history in three countries. 

 
 

Watch for book events in America, Australia & Denmark for Finding PAX

 

Wind Spur is the articulation of a dream. It's the "imprint" that came to mind when the editor of my first book Finding PAX, Jan Pogue (who was nearing the end of a decades-long career as co-founder/publisher at Vineyard Stories) asked what I wanted to put in that line on the Library of Congress form.

With at least two more non-fiction books in the works (one, a prequel to Finding PAX called When A Cowgirl Goes to Sea, (scheduled for release in 2018) and another about my mother's life titled Indomitable: daughter of a daughter of the Dust Bowl) and a fictional series about reconnecting lost dogs and owners based on true stories of rescue with my border collie Chase - it made sense to group the books together under one publisher's imprint.

So, here it is. Tiny, hopeful, Wind Spur Books! Thank you for your support.